BPA: What You Should Know

BPA has been a buzz word the past few years, concerning our food and the potential health risks associated with it. I’m all for using less processed chemicals in our daily routine, so I decided to do a little research on the subject before I decide that BPA is the enemy. This is something I feel that we do too often. We find something new to hate, or rail on when there could be benefits to whatever it is that’s gained our disapproval. So in the following, I’ll be writing about the research I’ve done on the subject, and the changes I’ll be making to my purchasing habits, if any. Hopefully I’ll be able to clarify some of the questions around BPA for myself and others.

BPA: What is it?

BPA stands for bisphenol A, which is a chemical that is used to make certain resins and plastics. These resins and plastics are then used in the packaging that store the foods we purchase. They’re usually found in some plastic containers, or sprayed inside of tin cans that hold the food we eat. The primary concern with BPA is, that when the chemical is heated, it can then leach into the food that the container is holding. A reported 93% of Americans over the age of six have been found to have BPA in their urine.

BPA & Health Risks

This is a concerningly large percentage of people, if the chemical is detrimental to our health. If so, then it could have grave consequences. And according to this article from the National Library of Medicine, the effects of BPA aren’t wholly benign. Some risk factors include, “…BPA has been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of several endocrine disorders including female and male infertility, precocious puberty, hormone dependent tumors such as breast and prostate cancer and several metabolic disorders…”. That’s a long list of reasons to stay away from packaging containing BPA.

Other Perspectives

There is another side to the BPA story. One which suggests that the chemical is safe in the amounts that it is found in the items and food packaging we use everyday. This site, Facts About BPA, lays out an argument for the continued use of BPA in products.

The very title of the site states that this is the truth about BPA. While they may not be lying about how they are presenting their information, they skirt the negative and potential side effects of the chemical. It’s also worth noting that the people who own and operate the website are also the largest producers of the chemical. So it would be fair to say they have a vested interest in the positive disposition of their product.

So Which is the Best Choice, BPA or BPA-Free?

For me and my health, I’m leaning more towards the camp of BPA free. It seems to me that taking in any amount of chemical that is proven to cause a variety of healthy malades, seems irresponsible. Why take the risk? Even if the FDA is saying that there are “safe” levels that we can ingest. We’re most likely never going to completely avoid BPA. Though lessening our contact to it will certainly reduce the chances of the potential health risks.

This also gives us the opportunity to use fresher ingredients in our meal prep. Since BPA is mostly found in the lining of cans and in plastics, if we purchase fresh produce and proteins, we’ll be steering clear of the chemical. And our food will taste fresher in the process.

Avoiding BPA in Our Day to Day

Now that we have some idea of how BPA interacts with our bodies, my next question is, where it can be found and how do we avoid it? As it turns out, BPA is found in a lot of different products we use regularly. Here’s a link to “EWG”‘s site, which I found on “Eat This, Not That”. EWG has a pretty comprehensive list of foods that shows which packaging contains BPA. Just type the name of the food and brand into the search bar to see if they show up on their list. It’s stated on their site that there’s over 16,000 products containing BPA. So it’s worth checking out if you’re concerned.

Items such as plastic storage containers and water bottles, baby bottles are made with BPA and tin cans are lined with the chemical to protect its contents from the off taste of tin. Thermal register tape is coated with it, as well as certain types of dental fillings, and most plastics that are marked with the numbers 3 and 7. This article from NPR goes into some detail about how to avoid it.

Image Credits: “How to avoid BPA” by DES Daughter is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Using Fewer Processed Foods While Cooking

How I’m approaching this dilemma is, by cooking more of my foods from their more whole, natural states. For example if a recipe calls for black beans, instead opening up a can, I’ll use my instant pot to cook a batch. As far as I know, the plastic bags holding the dry beans don’t contain BPA and the beans are cooked to order each time.

Instant Beans

I used to cook black bean soup at a restaurant I worked in in my twenties. So I know the time that’s involved in cooking dry beans from scratch on the range can be lengthy. The instant pot is an incredible time saver. Here is a link to The Minimalist Baker’s post on cooking grains and beans using the instant pot. As I’ve said above, it is a great way to save time and definitely worth looking into getting one if you do a lot of cooking. Here’s a link to some product reviews of the different brands and types of pressure cooking devices from The Spruce Eats. They cover everything from stove top pressure cookers to electric ones, slow cookers and pressure canners.

Cook to Order

Another way to avoid processed food would be to purchase fewer premade meals. I know we’re not all afforded the luxury of time. And I recognize that I’m coming from a cooking background. So my knowledge level and cooking skills aren’t where everybody is, and that they save me time. But learning to cook is a great way to take care of yourself while also nourishing your body and creating stronger bonds with family and friends.

If you’re new to cooking, here’s a link to Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street Cooking School. It’s mostly online, and they have loads of resources for free. You can learn recipes developed by Christopher Kimball and his team, but you can also learn other cooking techniques. Their most recent class was on knife skills. A basic for any would be chef to learn for sure.

Farm to Table

And the ultimate way to use fewer processed foods, grow your own! I have many happy memories of playing in my father’s community plot and the park next to it as a child. Along with creating fond memories, and making a beautiful space to enjoy, you also can’t beat the freshness of the produce you’ll be harvesting. Not to mention the money you’ll be saving by growing your own.

Other Ways to Avoid BPA

Water Bottles

One of the big ones on the list for me was using a different water bottle. I use to use an old plastic Nalgene. Which according to this post from Healthfully, Nalgene hasn’t used BPA in the production of their bottles since 2008. And fortunately for me, I received a stainless steel travel mug as a gift and have been using it ever since. The water bottle I had been using was definitely older than 2008. So it was time for an upgrade for sure.

Stainless steel works well for my needs as I make a lot of tea during the course of the day. Especially since heat is what releases BPA into the liquid of what certain types of plastic containers are holding. So if you’re in need of a new water bottle, or you are picking up something at a store on your way somewhere, check the bottom of your bottle.

This article from The Berkey, says that any container marked with a 3 or 7 in the recycling symbol, or labeled as “PC”, may contain BPA and or other toxic chemicals, such as BPS or BPF, that could be dangerous to your health. “…even little concentrations of BPS and BPF may upset the capacity of your cells in a path like BPA”-Berkey. So it’s best to avoid these containers altogether.

Also, I do have a water bottle on the nightstand next to my bed. On the bottom of the bottle, there is an etching, stating that it’s BPA free. So when in doubt, check the bottom. Also, going to the website of the company that made your bottle may answer some of your questions about what’s in their products as well.

Thinning Out Your Plastic Collection

This may also be a great opportunity to go through your water bottles, weeding out any that could contain hazardous chemicals. But also a chance to look at your other kitchen storage containers, devices and appliances. Maybe the plastic containers you use to store leftovers, the ones that you picked up from that takeout place, are marked with a “3”. Or the bowl of your food processor has the letters “PC” on it.

This way you’re able to take inventory of what may need replacing. Or just put them in the recycling. For example, if you have a blender that has BPA in it, then every time you blend something right from the range you’ll be melding more than just flavors into your sauce.

Or you can do what I’ve done, which is make the switch from plastic storage containers to glass. I use quart sized Ball Jars for not only my dry goods, but also when I cook meal prep. I store all my meals in the same jars as well. And when I take lunch or dinner to work with me, I also take a glass lunch box with a bamboo lid. And for breakie, I use pint sized Ball Jars for my overnight oats. This way, no chemicals. And I’m also using natural materials that will be recycled or decompose when I’m done with them. Win win.

Buying Bulk

Also if you live buy a natural grocery, or have a store in your city that has a bulk product section, then buying your soaps and detergents in bulk, using eco-conscious, reusable packaging, is another option. There are two places that are somewhat close by to where I live. Both which sell items such as body wash and laundry detergent. And you can fill your own containers with their product.

How it works is, you bring your own container, or sometimes they have containers there for you to use. A communal container exchange where people leave old containers for somebody else to use. You tare the weight of your container, such as a glass jar, and write it down on a sticker you then apply to the jar or whatever you’re using. When you bring the item to check out, they weigh it as they would weigh produce at most grocery stores. They then subtract the weight of the container from the product weight.

The products are usually cheaper than most of their pre-packaged counterparts, because you’re not paying for the packaging. But also reduced shipping weight lessens the use of fossil fuels to get the product to you. Reduced packaging and avoiding toxic chemicals, less fuel being used and the same quality of product. What’s not to like? The only way to clean more green is to make your own products.

Wrapping Up… Or Unwrapping Rather

BPA has been linked to so many health concerns that even though the FDA says there are safe levels of the chemical to consume, my perspective is why take the risk? We have alternatives. And lucky for us, they’ve been around for millennia. There’s also the health benefits to consider, when we eat fresher and fewer processed foods. So if you’re concerned about the state of the food you’re purchasing, or just want to reduce the amount of plastics you consume, think about incorporating some of these changes into your shopping habits and life style. And you’ll inadvertently be creating greener and healthier habits in the process. Peace & thanks for reading : )

Image Credits: “Plastic Bottle Waste” by Tony Webster is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Updated: 11/27/22

Recycling: Are We Really Making a Difference?

I remember reading and hearing about how China is refusing our recycling about two years ago. It was concerning to find out we were shipping our trash to other countries, but to learn that we are no longer able to any more and the uncertainty that comes with that, left me feeling a bit anxious. What are we doing with our recycling? This seems like something so basic that I’m floored we don’t already have a plan in place already.

One Big Problem

We can’t just leave our garbage to pile up with nowhere for it to go. Why was this not thought through? Instead of a plan, we have a pollution problem that is literally choking our oceans and lakes. We’re using chemicals that are poisoning our foods and releasing volatile organic compounds into our atmosphere and accelerating climate change. And most of this is due in large part to the petrochemical companies creating products that are harmful to people and the environment. Mostly under the guise of it being cheap. This just isn’t acceptable in my book and I hope others agree.

So I’m angry about this. And I’d say this my anger is a healthy response to an unhealthy situation. But I don’t want to be blinded by my emotions that come with the sense of being wronged. Yes there are horrible things happening in the world, but that doesn’t mean that I will default to black and white thinking. I.e. everything involving petroleum is evil and all plastics are wrong. It’s helpful to think of these as problems that we’ve stumbled into. Using what we knew at the time to be the best solutions to what we were facing.

But if you’re anything like me, it’s difficult to draw the line that it doesn’t fall within my realm of responsibility to “solve” these issues. Taking on too much responsibility is something I know I struggle with. And I’m sure I’m not alone. So what’s the alternative to feeling like we have to come up with a solution? Probably becoming part of the solution. Then advocating for the solutions that are most helpful. So what are some solutions to the problems we’re facing?

Things That Need Our Attention

Let’s take a look at some of the problems we’re facing first, to get a better understanding of what we’re up against. According to the Columbia Climate School, of the 267 million tons of materials recycled in the U.S. in 2017, only about 94 million tons were composted or recycled. Much of the unrecycled material was either incinerated for energy, or went to landfills.

A large part of the problem is that there is no centralized program for recycling, states side. In the States, there is no federal recycling program that is coming up with solutions and instituting guidelines for the process. It is now currently the responsibility of 20,000 communities in the U.S. to decide what and how to recycle its waste. And what’s more is, that these recycling programs need to compete with other municipal programs. Programs such as schools and road maintenance for funding. This seems like a lose lose situation.

And to add to the confusion, the only plastics that are being recycled in the U.S. are 1 and 2. Plastics 3-7 are not being recycled, even though they are labeled as such. No bueno. This leads to a vast majority of plastics being sent to the incinerator to produce energy. Along with the plastics that are able to be recycled, but aren’t do to contamination. I.e. not being thoroughly cleaned. This means a majority of the material we are sending out with the intentions of being recycled, end up in the incinerator.

Reduce, Reuse & Zero-Waste Living

With all this information and misinformation, how do we begin to feel as though we are making a difference? From my understanding, the tenets of reduce, reuse, recycle and refuse, still focus on all the areas we need to be paying attention to, to be a part of the solution. One way of living that encapsulates a majority of these tenets is zero waste living.

The concept of living zero waste is simple. It’s to purchase goods that have no component that can’t be recycled, composted or reused in some way. For example, purchasing items from the bulk bins at grocery stores, and carrying them home in cotton, reusable bags or glass jars is a way to eliminate the plastic wrap or packaging that is too flimsy to be properly recycled. Keeping as many items that turn into waste out of landfills and incinerators is the guiding ethos behind the idea of living zero waste.

And this is not an easy way to live for sure. So many items are packaged in some form of unsustainable material, that often times you will have to go out of your way to find alternatives. One big way to make an impact, as I mentioned above, is to buy product in bulk. And I’m not talking about the big box stores where you can buy a years worth of toilet paper on the cheap. But rather stores that have a section with bulk items, that aren’t prepackaged. Where you can bring your own containers to take home with you.

Places to Start Living More Waste Free

Whole Foods has a bulk section, though it was temporarily suspended due to concerns with Covid. My local store has recently put there bulk section back into use starting on June 2nd. There are other places to buy bulk as well. This site from Zero Waste Nerd has a location finder where you can enter your locality and their site will list some of the known zero waste grocery stores near you. I found a shop on my commute that sells household cleaning supplies in bulk. All you need to do is bring a container and fill up anything from laundry soap, to all purpose cleaners. This is a great way to reduce a lot of the packaging that comes with so many of the products we buy regularly.

Another site I found in my search, Litterless, has a similar approach in that they list stores by state, then city, that have bulk shopping options. You can choose your state from the list on their homepage, then they have a list of cities, with the stores and what they sell in alphabetical order. They also link to the store’s site, so you can check them out in advance to see if they have and are what you are looking for.

Buying Bulk

While we’re on the subject, how do you carry these items home to be used? You can’t just toss a bunch of flour or oats in your basket! For items such as the cleaning supplies, glass ball jars work well. This way you can buy as much as you need, use them straight from the jar in the case of laundry detergent, or refill your reusable spray bottle for other types of cleansers. I use the wide mouth Ball Jars which I feel are easier to use a scoop or measuring cup with.

If you’re buying bulk produce, reusable cotton muslin bags will do the trick. You can put all your fruits and vegetables in these bags. I use mine for items such as green beans and fresh herbs. I haven’t tried this, but you may also be able to use these bags for some dry goods as well. They would be great for items such as beans and oats. Anything large enough not to slip through the weave of the bags. Glass jars will also work for spices and baking needs. Such as flour or sugar. Just make sure to ask an employee to help you tare the weight of the jar before you load up.

For me, the items I buy bulk at the stores have a corresponding container at home. So if I buy a pound of wild rice, I have a jar waiting in my cupboard to be filled. This way I don’t have a bunch of bags loosely cluttering up my cabinet space. And I can reuse the same few bags I have to refill different items.

So instead of using one bag for each item to then be stored in, I can have a few bags that I use to refill the containers that are already dedicated to a particular item. And I can easily switch it up to contain other items as needed. This way I only need as many bags as items I need to refill. This keeps things organized while also cutting back on the need to buy a large amount of one type of container (and then carry them everywhere).

How Much Trash Do You Produce?

Another way to get a handle on your garbage consumption is to do a trash audit. This is as simple as it sounds. Take your trash, probably a week’s worth and go through it to see what you throw away. What are the items you are throwing away the most? What is filling up your recycling bin? From here, you can make the decision to cut back on the items that you find reoccurring the most. If you find that you are recycling a large amount of shampoo and soap bottles, maybe making the switch to something like bar soap for both hair and body. Or visit a bulk cleaning supply store like the one I mentioned above, to reduce the amount of plastic that is adding up in your recycling.

Cleaners & Supplies

There are also services where you can order refills for different products such as laundry soap. Companies like My Green Fills, sell packages of concentrated laundry products, detergents, stain removers and other laundry needs. This may not be zero waste, but it greatly reduces the amount of plastic bottles that add up quickly as a result of our laundry needs. And it costs less as well. The way it works is; they send you a bottle with packages of dry refills, that you reconstitute with warm water. Once you go through the packages, you order more and use the same container to refill your detergents.

Paper towels are a big one for me. Switching to a dish towel could be the answer to this issue. Washing a few dish towels each week will definitely save on the waste produced by the paper industry. These can be used as paper towels are, only washed and hung to dry after each use. Make sure to buy cotton towels and avoid microfiber ones, as they can release large amounts of plastic fibers into the ocean, which are dangerous to aquatic life.

Also, old tee shirts work great as cleaning rags. When I retire a work shirt, I will oftentimes cut it up to use as extra cloth rags. They can be used for anything from cleaning up messes to dusting furniture. And as long as you are wearing 100% cotton clothing, it can be tossed into the compost when you’re finished with it.

Composting

While we’re on the subject, composting is a great way to reduce the food waste we accumulate. If you have a garden or space for a compost bin, this should be a fairly easy task. There are premade bins you can buy that house compost, but you can also make your own. This article from The Spruce goes into the different methods you can use to make your own compost pile. One of them is making your own bin using a trash barrel. Something that is accessible to just about everybody.

And depending on where you live, there are companies that will pick up your compost for you. Curbside, just as your garbage and recyclables are already picked up. In Massachusetts, the Boston area, we have Black Earth Composting. Call your local municipal office to find out if there are services near you that you can join. Also a quick google search will yield plenty of results to get you started on your composting journey.

Refusing Plastic While Eating Out

There is also a new trend in food markets and take out places where many of these businesses are switching to compostable containers and utensils for their take out containers and cutlery. Refusing plastic utensils and shopping at places that use compostable containers is a great way to make a small change in the ways we consume garbage. Asking a business if they use compostable or traditional containers will go a long way to keeping these items out of the landfills and incinerators. And in a pinch, bring your own reusable utensils with you when ordering take out. Just tell them you don’t need the utensils.

Other Resources For Plastic Management, AKA Mushrooms

And it isn’t only up to us as consumers to help slow down or stop the consumption of plastics. There is some exciting research that suggests that there are types of mushrooms that are able to use polyurethane, a main component in plastic, as its main food source. This means that some of the mushrooms that we eat, may be the solution to breaking down materials that would normally take generations to biodegrade. And the end result is something tasty for us to eat. Win win!

This article from Treehugger goes into detail about the different types of mushrooms and how they were discovered. Also what they may be able to do for us in the plastic waste department. There is also mention of a mushroom that is able to breakdown polyester. Which, if you’ve read my post on whether it’s better to buy cotton or recycled polyester, you’ll know that this is a major environmental threat. Having an organic solution to these environmental threats is welcome news after what seems like a never ending stream of potentially dangerous outcomes for our future, in regards to our waste consumption.

There’s a lot to be done on the waste management front. Luckily there are motivated people out there that are looking for ways to make the most impact on what seems like a pretty grim looking situation. This post from Wild Minimalist has some suggestions on how to shop zero waste. She mostly focuses on Whole Foods, but you may be able to try these methods out elsewhere, in other stores as well.

The E in Environmental

And one more tip that isn’t related to tangible objects. I was recently talking with a friend who told me that if you tend to collect emails in your inbox, that is taking a hefty toll on the environment. It may only be a few dozen, or maybe a hundred unread emails, but what I hadn’t realized, and what my friend pointed out to me was, that all those emails need to be stored on servers somewhere. This means that there is electricity being pumped into these storage facilities to hold and handle all your unread emails. So keeping a clean inbox is directly related to keeping with a greener lifestyle.

And this blog, Going Zero Waste, is also a great resource for making some of the switches from a less sustainable way of living, to a more green one. It can feel overwhelming for sure. But remember, you don’t have to solve all the problems all at once. And there are loads of people out there searching for and finding solutions to these problems as well. So relax, and take it one green step at a time. I hope this has been helpful, and as always, peace & thanks for reading : )

Image Credits: “Recycle Logo From Recycling Bin” by csatch is marked with CC0 1.0

Updated: 9/18/22

Sustainable Clothing: Is it Better to Buy Cotton, or Recycled Polyester?

I was looking for a new hooded sweatshirt a few days ago when I realized I only have two that aren’t exercise clothing. One being two sizes too large for me and the other I use almost every day. It’ll only be a matter of time before the one I wear everyday becomes threadbare. And The other is comically large on me. So I usually only wear it around the house. So in search of a new sweatshirt, I went to the website of a company I’ve bought from in the past, Mexicalli Blues, and was looking through their products in search of a new, sustainable sweatshirt.

Reading The Clothing Labels

I like the the companies clothing. The style as well as the simplicity of them. So the next step was to look at the materials label. The company prides itself on being sustainable so I figured I’d have nothing to worry about. But when I checked the labels, it said that they were made with recycled materials. I knew this meant polyester to some degree. This made me wonder what the ramifications are of using plastic in clothing. Even if it’s from recycled sources as the main material component.

My instinct is that using plastics to any degree, including clothing, perpetuates the cycle and need to rely on petrochemical materials. The idea of having more plastic floating around in one form or another is unsettling to me. I’m not saying that all plastics are inherently bad. I appreciate that plastics have been used to change many people’s lives for the better. But it seems to me that we first need to get our collective plastic consumption under control before we think about expanding its use into more aspects of our day to day lives.

Being More Mindful of Clothing Materials & the Environment

As far as my clothing goes, I’d like to lean towards more natural fibers. Fibers such as cotton and wool. I know that at least with cotton, the material will eventually decompose. And more than likely in my lifetime. And a quick Google search tells me that wool will decompose in six months under ideal conditions. But plastic however will stay around for some time, breaking down further into smaller pieces. This causes all sorts of environmental hazards.

Consequences for Our Oceans

Both small and large aquatic animals mistake plastics for food. Certain whales for instance, have been found with many pounds of plastic waste in their stomach. But one of the reasons that plastic clothing in particular is such an environmental threat is, that when washed the fabric degrades, releasing hundreds of thousands of microfibers into the aquatic environment. There they are consumed by marine life.

Fresh and saltwater animals alike consume them, as the waste makes its way into our waters and up the food chain. As Lisa Messinger from The Guardian put it in her article, “How your clothes are poisoning our oceans and food supply“, when a professor cut open a fish from the great lakes, they found thousands of microfibers weaving their way in and around the gastrointestinal tract of the freshwater dweller. No bueno.

This is concerning to say the least. According to Greenpeace, 30% of plastic pollution could be caused from microfibers. In this article by Green Peace, “what are microfibers and why are our clothes polluting the oceans?“, they explain that, “Europe and Central Asia alone dump the equivalent of 54 plastic bags worth of microplastics per person per week into the oceans.” More disheartening news. And the older the garment is, the more fibers it releases, according to a study paid for by Patagonia.

The more I continued to read about the effects of microfibers on the environment, the more I realized that there wasn’t really an option. If I want to live a more sustainable life style, I need to stop buying clothing made from synthetic materials.

Priorities, Standards & the Companies Embodying Them

With all this new information swimming around in my mind, I was left with my new plan, to buy more sustainable clothing. Though unfortunately I also was left without much direction. The brand I was originally looking to for my new sweatshirt had a bullet point under the specs that said it was made from, “bluesign approved materials“. This caught my eye and could possibly be some of the direction I was looking for. So I headed over to their website to see what they are about.

bluesign

From what I was able to gather, the Swiss Company is an independent resource. Their focus is on advocating for better working conditions for employees and a more sustainable way of producing goods during every aspect of their production. A noble cause indeed. But this doesn’t necessarily mean that a product is 100% sustainable. After all, the sweatshirt I was looking at that was bluesign approved was made with 60% recycled polyester.

That’s not to say that the company isn’t doing important work. Just because I’ve set my standard at wanting to purchase natural materials for clothing, doesn’t mean it’s the most important one by any means. Also, this made me think that maybe my standards are too lofty. bluesign also focuses on working with companies to reduce the amounts and toxicity of the chemicals the company uses. As well as focusing on the human element of the industry. Such as fair wages and safe working conditions for employees. All important aspects to investigate and consider when purchasing from a company.

Certified B Corp.

The next group of businesses I stumbled across in my search for sustainable clothing was Certified B Corporations. Another company focused on the ethical production of goods and their effects on workers rights, consumers rights and the environmental impact of the products companies produces.

This reminds me of a business I go to who solely employed homeless persons. I’ve often heard in the past that all the homeless really need to do is to get a job. Though I imagine it would be difficult for a number of reasons for a homeless person to complete an interview successfully, let alone maintain the tasks we take for granted in keeping a job! From finding clean clothes and a place to shower, to printing out a resume. Also, not having a stable mailing address or reliable transportation. The homeless person has a mountain of obstacles to overcome!

So from the perspective of protecting employee rights, I can understand and appreciate the work that is being done from B certified corporations. But as far as clothing and B Corps. goes, they have a blog, where in one post they explore a few companies in the fashion industry and how they are making a difference. One of the companies, Bombas, is mentioned as donating a pair of socks to homeless shelters for every pair sold. This is a stellar way to give back to the community. One of the most requested items at homeless shelters are socks. Win, win.

The one area that wasn’t clear however, was the research they did and the numbers they used to score each company. There was general information about what the practices they are evaluating were, but they did not go into detail on the information they used to evaluate the practices. Upon further reading, they explained that these evaluations were taken by the corporations themselves. Self-evaluations.

Does this mean that a company is giving itself an assessment of how they perform in each category? Or is there a disinterested third party that is evaluating the company and its results? I’d like to believe that these companies are honest and accountable for their actions, but with so much ambiguity it would be nice to know for sure who’s doing the evaluating.

B Lab

B Lab is another company that evaluates corporations on a spectrum of concerns. A Wikipedia article explains that B Lab is a company that gives out certifications to companies that meet a certain standard of “transparency, accountability, sustainability and performance”. But again, how B Lab comes up with the standards that they grade these companies with is not totally clear.

From what I understand of the B certification, it is something that a willing company takes as a self assessment. Evaluating their performance using B Lab’s standards and creates a plan around where they find weaknesses in their company. This is definitely better than not doing anything. And it’s comforting to know that there are corporations out there that are willing to take a look at their practices and to make a change for the better. I only wish that B Lab was more transparent with their evaluation methods.

Green Stars Project

There are few places that I could find that gave ethical reviews on companies in general. Reviews of clothing companies were few and far between. There was however one website that showed some promise. The Green Stars Project. This is a project that empowers people to write reviews of and rate different companies using a system based on criteria that covers topics from fair working wages to the environmental impact. It takes into consideration the company’s use of our resources, to the ethical treatment of animals, to how the company impacts the community. The list is only limited to the knowledge that individuals feel is important to their ethical standards.

The only downside to this is that it relies on individuals to write these reviews in the review section of a particular item. It’s decentralized. This is good because it’s coming directly from the consumer and their knowledge base. But from what I understand of the system, there is no way to search for products by their Green Star rating. So if I was looking for an ethically sourced piece of clothing, I would have to do the research to find the company and product. Then write a review or hope that there was one already written.

Better World Shopper

The Green Stars Project does however have a resources page where they list a few sites that do have lists of companies that have done some research on ethical businesses. One of the sites listed is Better World Shopper. Here you are able to search companies by category and grade. I found some clothing companies that are listed by grade and could easily tell which companies are more ethically focused than others.

Even with the grading system, if you are looking to replace synthetics with natural fibers as I am, you still need to read the labels. But it’s nice knowing that there are people out there doing the work and looking for ethically and socially responsible companies. Also that we have a place to at least start our search for better buying choices.

Fairtrade Certification

The Fairtrade certification means that the business is working to sustain the safe working conditions of the employee. Also that the company is protecting the environment. Also, helping to pay sustainable wages for workers as well as community development funding, according to their website. This is a huge step forward in helping to reduce not only the environmental impact of a company, but also the fair treatment of the employees and workers rights while building healthier communities.

Pact

There are some companies that do hit a lot of the marks as far as making sustainable clothing goes. One company, and the one I’m probably going to buy my sweatshirt from, is Pact. This company provides a wide variety of organic cotton and sustainable clothing. They are environmentally conscious of the production of their clothing by using sustainable materials as well as organic fabrics, while focusing on the well-being of their employees. They also work closely with the Fairtrade certified organization.

Positive Resources From the Community

And finally, in this article published by The Good Trade, they cover 35 different companies that have ethical and sustainable practices! This was an exciting find. To think that there are so many companies that are willing to put the effort into making sustainable products and work towards the betterment of workers and the environment. Knowing there are more options when looking for sustainable ways to fill your wardrobe, it feels like there is less of a burden knowing we are helping to lessen our impact in purchasing clothing.

Minding Your Budget & Longevity

I will add that some of these clothing lines can get pretty pricey. One of the clothing companies I mentioned above, Nudies Jean Co, has jeans that range from $185 to $400. That’s a lot of money for a pair of jeans no matter how you look at it. But according to The Food Diary, they last longer than other brands of jeans. Kezia said that her husband’s pair of jeans have lasted four years now and they are still going strong. The website also has a repair service. So if there’s been some damage done to your jeans, you can fix them up instead of throwing them away. So the lifespan of the garment is something to consider when looking at the price tag as well as the production methods.

Start a Sinking Fund

Something that has helped me along the way, with purchasing clothing on a budget, is to establish a sinking fund for new clothing purchases. I don’t buy clothing often. So when I need something it’s usually small, like a package of socks or underwear. But if you need to replace a winter coat, or a pair of boots, this can get expensive.

A sinking fund is a good way to have a certain amount of cash on hand in case you need to replace items in your wardrobe. If you’re not familiar with the term, a sinking fund is where you set up a savings for a specific item. In this case it would be clothing. And you contribute a set amount of money each week, pay period or month to the fund. This way you have what you need, when you need it. And you don’t have to scramble to find $300 dollars to purchase a new winter jacket that you may have lost on the slopes.

I contribute $25 dollars a pay period to mine and I’ve decided to cap my fund at $400. This way I won’t look at my fund one day and realize I’ve amassed thousands of dollars into something that doesn’t require that much money! This way I can replace the most expensive article of clothing in my wardrobe while still feeling confident that I can take care of my basics when I need them.

Establishing & Standing by My Values When Buying Clothing

So in the end, some companies that use microfibers that are polluting our oceans may still be leading the way in other areas of sustainability. It may come down to what your personal preferences are for buying and supporting sustainable clothing. For me it’s buying organic cotton or wool when I have a choice, and recycled fibers if it’s something that requires them. Something like a raincoat or winter boots.

Also, knowing that I’m supporting workers rights, and lessening the environmental impact my clothes are having is something that I can feel good about supporting. Knowing that I’m not just pushing off the problems of today onto the next generation helps me to rest a little easier. And with communities like The Green Star Project, it’s exciting to think that there could be an independent source and knowledge base coming together to create a more ethical way to purchase clothing.

It’s also nice knowing that companies such as B Certified Corporations, bluesign and Fairtrade are out there, putting the work in to help lead the way in helping companies produce their goods in a more sustainable way. While also letting consumers know which companies are doing the work. I’ll be linking some of these companies in my community page for those who are looking to make their wardrobe a little greener. And I’d love to hear about the companies you’ve found that are doing good work as well.

Priorities & Personal Standards

Some of the companies that I’ve come across in my search for ethical and sound businesses are very specific in what they offer. For example there are many companies that focus on socks and underwear solely. So when I came across this post by Whole Body Diary, on sustainable clothing lines, I was excited that there are more people out there searching for ethical ways to purchase a variety of clothing.

Whole Body Diary brings up a good point and one that I am struggling with. Many of the companies she lists on her blog are not 100% sustainable. This brings me back to my original question, is it better to buy cotton or recycled plastic? But as Kezia. from Whole Body Diary explains, not every company is going to hit every sustainable mark. Some may focus on organic cotton, like Nudies Jean company, while others help the larger community. Companies such as Bombas, who I’ve mentioned above.

The Take away? Our search for sustainable isn’t going to be a perfect one. But if we choose to search for companies that are trying to make a difference on some level, we’re supporting the larger whole of the mission. To buy from and support more sustainable businesses. This is where I leave you good reader, and as always, peace & thanks for reading : )

Image Credits: “Nature’s Coatrack” by m01229 is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Updated: 9/14/2022

A More Sustainable Home: 7 Tips and Tricks to Help Keep Your Space a Little Greener

“More recently I’ve adopted the more sustainable elements of the culture.”

In the Beginning it Was Drugs & Music Over Sustainability

My desire to live a greener, more sustainable life style probably started when I was in high school. It was the mid-nineties and hippy culture was re-emerging as the popular subculture. Though in the 90’s I feel it was more about the drugs and music than it was about free love. Or sustainability for that matter. Though I remember buying hemp pancake mix at a head shop in Cambridge Mass.

I remember one summer I went to a Phish festival up in Maine with a few friends of mine. The Lemon Wheel in ’98. We chose a spot to camp but unfortunately it was a few spots over from a tent that was selling nitrous balloons. It wouldn’t have been so bad if they hadn’t played the same 5 or so funk songs on repeat the entire weekend. I never heard “Brick House” so many times in a three day period, nor do I ever want to again 😀

As time passed, I changed in a lot of ways. But I always held onto some of that culture in my personality. I traded the drugs for coffee and now it’s most recent iteration tea. But I still bust out the Dead every once and a while and Phish as well.

7 More Sustainable Home Practices

More recently I’ve adopted the more sustainable elements of the culture. Recycling and buying sustainable goods that will last longer than their plastic counterparts being among them. Also making sure the items I’m buying have a shorter decomposition rate after they’ve run out their usefulness. So it wasn’t long before I started looking around my house to find ways of making the process of keeping to these tenants a little easier.

A Recycling For Every Room

One of the things I’ve started doing is keeping a recycling bag next to the rubbish barrels in all rooms. I started thinking about it while I was in the bathroom taking a shower. I reached for the face wash or the soap when I looked at the empty bottle of shampoo that had been sitting in the shower caddy for I don’t know how many weeks. My intention was to recycle it. But that meant going downstairs to the kitchen where the recycling is kept. And by the time I got dressed, I’d forgotten to go back into the bathroom to bring the bottle downstairs to be recycled.

So I put a paper bag next to the rubbish in my room and since I’ve found that my recycling fills up much faster than the garbage barrel does. Thinking about it now makes me a little sad. To think about all the things I could have been recycling that went to the trash previously. But it’s been nice feeling that I’m not just tossing things in the garbage that could go to recycling. Because I was too busy to go downstairs.

What Am I Wearing

Second, I’ve been paying closer attention to the fabrics that I’ve been keeping around my house. Instead of fabrics made from synthetic materials, I’ve been buying either 100% wool or cotton. And hopefully, slowly replace what I have that’s made from polyester. If you’ve read my post on taking care of your needs for clothing, you’ll know that I shop pretty regularly at thrift stores. So my selection is a little limited on what I’m able to buy that’s made from natural fibers.

This post on micro fiber pollution from Friend of the Earth, says that materials such as polyester, rayon and acrylic are a few of the fabrics that are made from plastics. According to the article one of the main issues with these fabrics is when they’re washed, they release microfibers into the water supply. The fibers are then consumed by sea animals in the food chain. The plastics absorb toxic chemicals from the environment, so who knows what they would do to our bodies. And for me, knowing that my clothing will turn to compost either during, or not long after I’m gone brings me a sense of ease. Knowing that the clothes I bought that are made from plastics will be sitting in landfills for decades makes me a bit uneasy.

How are You Washing Yourself and the Things You Own?

Speaking of laundry, the third thing on my sustainable list is making your own soaps. I’ve made soaps in the past using castile soap. Castile soap is a blend of oils and potassium hydroxide (lye), and can be mixed with various other common household ingredients to create household cleaners. Anything from body wash to all purpose cleaners can be made on the cheap from castile. By adding some essential oils to the mix, you can customize your new cleaners to suit your own personal tastes. Putting your own touch on the ways you clean yourself and your space.

The best part is, that the ingredients found in castile soap are all natural and have been used for centuries. So there’s no surprises when you pick up a bottle to clean surfaces that you prepare your food on. Or for use in the shower and sinks. Areas that you come in close contact with and use the most. This blog post on Live Simply by Kristin Marr, shows you how to craft your own household cleaners using castile soap.

As well as saving money, you can also cut back on the amount of plastic you’re buying by picking up a few reusable glass bottles to hold your new cleaners in. A quick google search will yield multiple results for spray bottles or dispensers for both hand soap and shampoo. Whatever your container needs may be, you’re likely to find it with ease.

Upgrade Your Hangers

My fourth idea is to replace the plastic hangers in your closet with wooden ones. Plastic hangers tend to break and need replacing more often than wooden ones do. And by replacing and recycling your old plastic hangers with wooden ones, your using a more sustainable material that will not only be functional a lot longer than their plastic counter parts, but look better as well.

Wear Your Clothes More Than Once

Fifth on the list is, I’ve been wearing some of my clothes more than once. Pants mostly and some pajamas, sweatshirts and bandanas (I wear a lot of bandanas.) By wearing some of the same clothes over again before washing, I have fewer clothes to wash which means the time between loads is longer. This saves on soap and water use and not to mention frees up some time you could be doing something else with. Also it helps to make your clothing last a little longer. Which means more money in your pocket.

Burning Beeswax

Sixth, as I’ve mentioned on this blog before I burn a lot of candles. I’m burning three as I’m typing this article! I haven’t made the switch yet, but beeswax candles are considered carbon neutral according to this article from alive. Candles are usually made from paraffin wax, which is a byproduct of crude oil. This means you’re releasing Co2 from oil production into the atmosphere when you burn paraffin candles.

The carbon in beeswax has been sequestered so recently from the environment, that it’s considered neutral. Plus, beeswax has the added bonus of releasing negative ions into the atmosphere. These ions purify the air of allergens and pollutants.

As I’ve said above, I’ve been in the habit of burning candles at night. The candles I burn now are made of coconut or soy wax. Either when I’m in my room unwinding from the day or cooking dinner at night. I feel they set a relaxing tone with their ambient lighting which gives everything a softer feel. It’s also something to look forward to. Coming home to a place that has spa vibes, cozy. When I’m having a tough day I can think about my self-care Sundays (Mondays now) and it brings that same sense of ease and calm. So burning bees wax candles brings some sustainable elements to your self-care routine.

Number One Not Number Two

The seventh one may make some a little squeamish but I’ve gotten in the habit of not flushing the toilet after going number one. I drink a lot of water and tea through the course of the day. So the amount of times I use the facilities is pretty high. Only flushing after a number two helps to reduce the amount of water that is being flushed into the wastewater treatment system.

The benefits are that you use less water. Which translates to a lower water bill and on the other end there is less waste to process. This saves on energy and resources.

Speaking of water, most people know this tip, but washing your clothes using cool water instead of warm helps to conserve energy that would otherwise go to heating your wash water. Which means you’ll save on your electric bill as well.

Cleaning Up

I hope some of these sustainable suggestions have been useful in some way. It won’t be easy, but together we can change the course of our collected future, one small change at a time. If you have any suggestions or tips you use regularly to help keep your home a little greener, I’d love to hear about them in the comments section below. Thanks for reading 🙂 peace.

Updated: 7/31/22

Misfits Market, Co-Ops and Farmer’s Market: Types of Markets That Could Help the Environment

Market. It’s where we buy the things we need. If you’re like most of us, when you go to the market it’s usually a super one. I live in Massachusetts so many of us go to Market Basket. You may have heard of them when they got some press back in 2014. There was concern in the form of protests and strikes, due to the firing of Arthur T. DeMulas by his cousin, Arthur S. DeMulas. Arthur T. eventually bought out his cousin Arthur S. and gave the employees of the grocery chain more benefits and raised the working standards, putting the workers and customers first.

As much as I love Market Basket and the story of Arthur T. taking care of his employees and in return them supporting him in regaining ownership of the chain, there are still some issues I feel are plaguing not just Market Basket but most stores, super and regular alike. The major issue with most food we buy today is, a sides from how we produce it, the amount of waste that’s involved in its packaging.

The Waste We Carry Our Food Home In

Some quick numbers, the EPA’s Advancing Sustainable Materials Management: 2017 Fact Sheet reported that U.S. citizens composted and recycled about 94.2 million metric tons of waste. While only about 35% of the waste we recycled and composted actually was recycled or composted. That’s 61.2 million metric tons of recyclable and compostable materials that went into landfills. Or found its way into the ocean. Or who knows where else. But that’s only one year’s worth of waste! And most of it is coming from packaging. I’m not sure how much is from food but I’m willing to bet it’s quite a bit.

When I’m at a grocery store or any kind of store for that matter, I’m amazed at the amount of packaging we are taking our food and products home in. Aisle after aisle of neatly packed and stacked items. Shimmering with plastic, glass, paper and metal, all kinds.

I understand that we’ve come a long way in food safety and for a while these types of packaging were necessary to deliver food free from bacteria to the folks buying it. But there are definitely more environmentally friendly and responsible ways of packaging our food that will keep it just as safe and just as fresh. We’ve come a long way in regards to making compostable packaging as well as in food safety. Why not put more of those practices into use?

Maybe Not Ideal But Heading in the Right Direction

For starters, there are zero waste grocery stores, but they are few and far between. I think there are about ten within a 16 mile radius of where I live and I’m in a small suburb just a few miles from Boston! I imagine pickings are slim the further you are from a major city. But there are other places you can shop to reduce waste even in your average grocery store.

Some groceries, and most co-ops, have bulk sections. You can usually find pantry staples in this aisle such as rice and beans, legumes and oats. And they are often times cheaper than their pre-packaged counter parts. This will reduce the amount of plastic packaging for sure, but only if you bring your own reusable bulk bags. Avoiding the plastic bags you find in bulk and produce sections. A quick Google search yields a variety of options and sizes for carrying home your loose items and produce. Some of which I’ve linked to below.

Speaking of produce, another way to cut down on packaging is to buy fresh produce. From either the grocery store, co-op or farmers markets. The only packaging is the boxes they’re delivered to the store in. Or in the case of farmers markets, the reusable containers they brought from the farm. And bringing your own reusable canvas or cotton bags to store them in will eliminate the need for those clear plastic produce bags. Or whatever package the vendors from farmers markets are offering which may or may not be recyclable.

And while you’re shopping for your new canvas or cotton produce and bulk bags, why not pick up some reusable silicone bags that are freezer friendly? To freeze your own fresh veg and fruit in. The shelf life and quality of freshly frozen fruits and veg are far superior to comparable pre-packaged frozen products. And the only downside is that there’s a little more prepwork involved. But if you set aside some time each week to prep the food you’re going to freeze, maybe while you’re already cooking dinner, you can save money and packaging that would have ended up in the landfill.

Storage is Key

So let’s say you get some reusable bulk bags for dry bulk items and produce. You buy a bunch of oatmeal and black beans. You get them home and now you have a bunch of loose dry bulk items and no where to put them! Don’t worry, I’ve got you covered. I use glass Ball jars with a wide mouth which makes them easy to fill with just about anything. Beans, rice and oats as I’ve mentioned, but also flours, sugars and teas (actually I use old glass peanut butter jars for tea).

They’re easy to stack, look good, and all while maximizing your usable cabinet storage space with surprising efficiency all while being super cheap. On top of all that, you can find them at pretty much any store you go to. I get mine at the supermarket but remember, they’re technically “seasonal”. Because they’re traditionally used for preserving, canning and pickling your garden harvest. So they may only be available in late summer and fall.

Land of Misfits No More!

And finally, Misfits Market buys produce from farmers that don’t meet the aesthetic standards of supermarkets. A surprising amount of viable fruits and vegetables are tossed in the garbage because they are misshapen, discolored or otherwise deemed as “ugly” by the would be buyers. Markets like Misfits steps in and offers to buy the produce from the farmers at a fraction of the price.

The produce is the same quality as you would find at the grocery and they pass along the savings to you, the customer. They also source their produce from farms that use organic methods and non-GMO seeds. Another benefit is that their packaging is a 100% sustainable. Either recyclable or compostable.

From super, to co-ops, to Misfits, to farmers. The above four types of markets are examples of where, given a little bit of forethought and planning, you could turn your next shopping trip into a greener one. Peace : ) and thanks for reading!

Image Credits: Adam Sergott, photo of vendors at Haymarket, Produce    Market in Boston MA

Updated: 2/3/22

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